AMPHIBIANS AND THE NOMMO

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This is an image of Adam and Eve and the Serpent from the 15th century manuscript known as the Book of Hours.1

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This image is particularly relevant to my research because the Serpent in this picture has feet, hands and a tail and looks more like a salamander than a serpent. Although the Nummo were referred to as “Serpents”, they were amphibians and my research reveals that they were identified with other amphibians in ancient cultures including frogs and salamanders, which appear in many of the Goddess artifacts of Old Europe. They were likewise associated with Sheela Na gig a figure, which has been found incorporated into old churches in medieval Ireland and England. According to Marija Gimbutas, Sheela Na gig was none other than the ancient frog or toad goddess, the birth giver and regeneratrix inherited from the Neolithic.2

Although the Nummo were hermaphrodites, they were associated with the sacred feminine. It is because of this that they were demonized by patriarchal cultures and turned into devils. The Dogon tell us that the Nummo were good, benevolent beings and responsible for life on the Earth and human civilization. It is thanks to the Dogon people that true knowledge about the Nummo has been preserved for us.

When the French anthropologists, Marcel Griaule and Germaine Dieterlen, began recording the Dogon religion in the 1930s, the Dogon were one of the last people in Africa to come under French rule. Prior to that time, the isolated Dogon had maintained their own beliefs and religious practices. The main reason that this religion has survived with the Dogon people is that they were living on the Cliffs of Bandiagara in Mali and were isolated from the rest of the world right up until the 1930s. The Dogon had protected their religious beliefs from outside influence including fleeing their original homeland of Mandé, west of Bamako, in Mali, sometime between the tenth and thirteenth centuries because of their refusal to convert to Islam. Bamako was the site of the ancient Mandingo Empire of Keita, which dominated a great part of West Africa in the thirteenth century. Their refusal to convert to Islam indicates the Dogon people’s strong desire to maintain their original belief system.3

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This evenly layered rock, photographed by the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA’s Curiosity Mars Rover, shows sedimentary signs of a Martian lakebed. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS4
The Dogon religion suggests that the Nummo may have come from Mars and not Sirius. The Nummo were symbolized by water and copper, which was also a symbol of Mars. Copper was considered to be at the source of creation. Humans and the Earth, on the other hand, were symbolized by iron.

According to the Dogon, when Mars was formed it was made of soft copper, which the Dogon called, menu olu. The word which designates the placenta, me, comes from the same root as the word copper menu. Copper was also called ya menu, “copper of past times.” It was the symbol of permanence because according to the Dogon it didn’t die. The expression designated “all ancient things that do not end” that do not disappear. The word menu, “piece” and mene, which designates the sacrifice or purification before the killing of the victim, are of the same root as me, placenta.

Ogotemmêli indicated that the Nummo came to Earth when something destroyed their world. Dogon symbolism points to a failed experiment of some type involving a red giant. Mars was identified with sacrifice, death and regeneration. At the time they came here, humans were animals living in caves. According to the Dogon, the Nummo brought life and intelligence to the Earth through genetic engineering.

For more information on recent discoveries on Mars see this posting in today’s New York Times.
Evidence of Lakes and Streams.

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Hand 1st-2nd century CE.5

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The bronze hand above was used in the worship of Sabazius, a god of Thracian or Phrygian (Ancient Turkey) origin, who was identified as the nomadic horseman and sky father god of the Phrygians and Thracians.6

Like Sabazius, Amma was the horseman and sky father of the Dogon people. A horseman, symbol of Amma, was sometimes placed next to or on a horse, which was a symbol of the Nummo.7 The Dogon compared the transformation of the Nummo and the moving of the Nummo’s ark or spaceship, to the rapid expansion of beings on the Earth, as depicted by the path of the horses to the four directions of space. The Dogon said that “with the chariot (ark), the horse (Nummo) brought forth the word.” The “word” symbolized DNA in the religion.8 On the back of Sabazius’ bronze hand shown above is a caduceus symbol, an ancient symbol I associate with DNA.

Hands decorated with religious symbols were designed to stand in Thracian or Phrygian sanctuaries or, like the one above was attached to poles for processional use.9 Griaule mentioned how some of the Dogon elders wore brown Phrygian caps suggesting other connections with ancient Phyrigia,10 a Turkish kingdom which reached its peak in around the 8th century BC.

Other symbols, which appear on the bronze hand above, are found in the Dogon religion including the ram and the serpent. Although the Nummo had fish tails, they were associated with serpents because of the way they moved on land, and it was the “Serpent” that Ogotemmêli most often used when referring to the Nummo. When they were in their spaceships the Nummo were known as “Celestial Rams.” This is because the spaceship had tubing that curved around like the horns of a ram.

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Plate IX of Splendor Solis 15th Century11

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This is Plate IX of the manuscript, Splendour Solis (Splendour of the Sun), which shows a two headed hermaphrodite with one red and one white wing, holding a circular mirror in one hand and an egg in the other.12

In The Master of Speech I refer to the importance of the colours red and white in the Dogon religion. The Dogon associated the colour red with a red giant sun, which was a symbol of life; and the colour white with a white dwarf star, a symbol of death. A white dwarf is what is left after a red giant sun has expelled all of its gas to create a nebula, which is a stellar nursery where all life is created. It is for this reason that the Dogon perceived a red sun as a pregnant sun. The colour red was therefore a female symbol and the colour white, a male symbol.13

Splendour Solis (Splendour of the Sun), which shows these Dogon colours in conjunction with a hermaphrodite and the sun, may suggest an association with the Dogon religion. These colours essentially identify opposite aspects of the same essence. The depiction of the hermaphrodite holding a mirror associates this figure with images of mermaids discussed in my books. The picture of The Penitent Magdalene, which was painted sometime between 1625 and 1650 by Georges de la Tour, shows her with a red skirt shaped like a fish tail looking into a mirror. Mermaids holding mirrors also appear in the watermarks of the Albigensians and in the misericords found carved on the underside of the hinged seats of choir-stalls in medieval churches and cathedrals that were discussed in my books, The Nummo and Day of the Fish.14

The main character of Splendour Solis is Solomon Trismosin, Adept and Teacher of Paracelsus and the book is an autobiographical account of his travels in search of the Philosopher’s Stone. Paracelsus was born as Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim on 11 November or 17 December in 1493 in Einsiedeln, Switzerland, and died on 24 September in 1541 in Salzburg. He was a Renaissance physician, botanist, alchemist, astrologer, and general occultist.” The manuscript was written in a language identified as Central German and reveals the alchemical death and rebirth of the king.15

In the introduction to the manuscript the author says, that the process (referring to the alchemical death and rebirth) “stretches through the History of Alchemy like a Sea-serpent.” The author continues,

The Sea-serpent may be a living aquatic monster that has survived the Deluge and other Cataclysms in some deep cave. It is with the Philosopher’s Stone as with the Sea-serpent, some say they have seen it, while the whole mass of mankind [humanity] has not; but the evidence of the few who have seen, outweighs the opinion of the many who may have not. A thing still is, though people know nothing about it. Like Argon or Neon, it may be universal, and remain universally unknown, yet, nevertheless, it exists.16

The above passage would suggest that some Nummo still inhabited the Earth and were known to a few individuals in the 1500s.17 In Chapter 18 of Day of the Fish, I refer to the 10th-century document, the Canon Episcopi, which describes how groups of women met at night to worship the pagan goddess Diana (Greek Artemis), and believed that they would ride in processions upon beasts led by Diana across “great spaces of the Earth.” The Greek Goddess Artemis (Roman Diana) was described as having a fish tail in some accounts and appears in statues from Ephesus in Turkey with a fish tail. Did the Nummo still interact with humans right up until the witch trials in the fifteenth century? These associations help to confirm that what is known to us today as the Dogon religion was practised throughout Europe before the witch trials.18

My research would tend to support Margaret Murray’s premise that the consistency of the stories from those convicted of witchcraft were evidence of a wide-spread pre-Christian religion existing in Europe. While the earliest witch trial occurred in 1324, the peak of the witch hunt was between 1580 and 1630 and the last known trial occurred in 1782. J.B. Hare describes some of Murray’s conclusions.

Murray, upon examination of the evidence, concluded that as barbaric as the witch trials were, they were conducted according to long-established legal procedures; that there was material evidence, witnesses corroborated each other, and (perhaps most tellingly) that not all confessions were extracted under torture. In some cases the accused testified willingly. They even went to their deaths unrepentantly insisting that their faith was the true religion and Christianity was false.19

My research indicates that the Dogon religion, which is associated with the pre-Christian religion, was likely the source of Christianity, supporting the claims of those who were murdered by the Inquisition. In the introduction to her book, The Witch-Cult in Western Europe, Murray states,

The deity of this cult was incarnate in a man, a woman, or an animal; the animal form being apparently earlier than the human, for the god was often spoken of as wearing the skin or attributes of an animal. At the same time, however, there was another form of the god in the shape of a man with two faces. Such a god is found in Italy (where he was called Janus or Dianus), in Southern France (see pp. 62, 129), and in the English Midlands. The feminine form of the name, Diana [Artemis], is found throughout Western Europe as the name of the female deity or leader of the so-called Witches, and it is for this reason that I have called this ancient religion the Dianic cult.20

Sir James George Frazer published The Golden Bough in 1922, and it is evident that fragments of this old religion were still being practiced in various parts of Europe at that time. More about this can be found in my book Day of the Fish.21

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SOURCE

http://www.shannondorey.com/blog/Dogon.html

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