ABRAHAM LINCOLN HAUNTINGLY SITS BEHIND  TRUMP … ”DESTINY”

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ABRAHAN LINCOLN

NEVER FORGOT

HIS LOVE FOR FREEDOM

OM
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Many Americans think of Abraham Lincoln, above all, as the president who freed the slaves. Immortalized as the “Great Emancipator,” he is widely regarded as a champion of black freedom who supported social equality of the races, and who fought the American Civil War (1861-1865) to free the slaves.

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“Those who deny freedom to others, deserve it not for themselves”

“Whenever I hear anyone arguing for slavery, I feel a strong impulse to see it tried on him personally.”

“All that I am or ever hope to be, I owe to my angel mother.”

“You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time, but you can not fool all of the people all of the time.”

“He has a right to criticize, who has a heart to help.”

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HOW MANY HEADS

DOES LINCOLN HAVE ?

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ALPHA AND OMEGA
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Tiamat was a dragon (DOGON), who had one head for each primary colour of the most common species of chromatics (black, blue, green, red, white).

Each head was able to operate entirely independently of each other and had the powers of a member of the respective race of dragonkind

Tiamat is a primordial creator of the ocean, with Apsu (DOGON) the creator of fresh water. She is the symbol of the chaos of primordial creation. Depicted as a woman, she represents the beauty of the feminine, depicted as the glistening one

She gives birth to the first generation of deities; her husband, Apsu, correctly assuming they are planning to kill him and usurp his throne, later makes war upon them and is killed.

Enraged, she, too, wars upon her husband’s murderers, taking on the form of a massive sea dragon, she is then slain by Enki, the storm-god Marduk, but not before she had brought forth the monsters of the Mesopotamian pantheon, including the first dragons

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TIAMAT

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tiamatx

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THE END IS THE BEGINNING

FYI

DRAGONS LAY EGGS … TIAMAT (CREATION)
HUMANS DON’T LAY EGGS … EVE (COPYCAT)

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