RICHARD X – THORNEWS : MY RED KACHINA IS SO HAWT

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Would a Brown Dwarf in our Solar System “Cook” Earth?
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Published on 19 Jan 2017
We’re talking about Brown Dwarfs and the possible effects they might have upon Earth. Come join us, it’s fun!

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The Forbes Article

http://www.forbes.com/forbes/welcome/?toURL=http://www.forbes.com/sites/jillianscudder/2016/12/16/astroquizzical-brown-dwarf-heat/&refURL=&referrer=#22496c8ec8e2

Would A Brown Dwarf Near Us Cook The Earth?

If a brown star came close to Earth, how hot would it get? Would it cook us like a roast in an oven? Honest question.

This artist’s conception illustrates the brown dwarf named 2MASSJ22282889-431026. NASA’s Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes observed the object to learn more about its turbulent atmosphere. Brown dwarfs are more massive and hotter than planets but lack the mass required to become sizzling stars. Their atmospheres can be similar to the giant planet Jupiter’s. Spitzer and Hubble simultaneously observed the object as it rotated every 1.4 hours. The results suggest wind-driven, planet-size clouds. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Brown dwarf stars are bizarre objects, which straddle the gap between fully functional stars, and massive planets like Jupiter. Brown dwarfs aren’t massive enough to start nuclear fusion in their cores, which is the process by which our own Sun reaches such tremendous temperatures. Without a large source of heat in their cores, brown dwarfs can’t do anything to maintain a stable temperature, and cool over time as they radiate their heat away into the void.

In many ways, we look to Jupiter as a model of what a small brown dwarf might look like. But, like many boundaries in astronomy, the border between a large Jupiter-like planet and a small brown dwarf is very, very fuzzy. Do you count a brown dwarf formed with a much larger, brighter star as a dual star system, or as a single one with a very massive planet?

This is an artist’s concept of the red dwarf star CHRX 73 (upper left) and its companion CHRX 73 B in the foreground (lower right) weighing in at 12 Jupiter masses. CHRX 73 B is one of the smallest companion objects ever seen around a normal star beyond our Sun. Estimated to be 12 times the mass of Jupiter, the object is small enough to be a planet, but also large enough to be a brown dwarf, a failed star. Credit: NASA, ESA and G. Bacon (STScI)

There are a few things we know should change. Brown dwarfs should be hotter than Jupiter, and this is largely because they contain more mass than Jupiter – typically at least ten times more than what Jupiter contains. But how does this mass mean that they’re warmer? I said earlier that brown dwarfs, like Jupiter, are incapable of burning hydrogen to create their warmth. Brown dwarfs rely on another mechanism, which is the crushing force of gravity.

Jillian Scudder , CONTRIBUTOR
Astrophysics Ph.D. I answer your questions about space.

Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.
If a brown star came close to Earth, how hot would it get? Would it cook us like a roast in an oven? Honest question.

This artist’s conception illustrates the brown dwarf named 2MASSJ22282889-431026. NASA’s Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes observed the object to learn more about its turbulent atmosphere. Brown dwarfs are more massive and hotter than planets but lack the mass required to become sizzling stars. Their atmospheres can be similar to the giant planet Jupiter’s. Spitzer and Hubble simultaneously observed the object as it rotated every 1.4 hours. The results suggest wind-driven, planet-size clouds. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
This artist’s conception illustrates the brown dwarf named 2MASSJ22282889-431026. NASA’s Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes observed the object to learn more about its turbulent atmosphere. Brown dwarfs are more massive and hotter than planets but lack the mass required to become sizzling stars. Their atmospheres can be similar to the giant planet Jupiter’s. Spitzer and Hubble simultaneously observed the object as it rotated every 1.4 hours. The results suggest wind-driven, planet-size clouds. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Brown dwarf stars are bizarre objects, which straddle the gap between fully functional stars, and massive planets like Jupiter. Brown dwarfs aren’t massive enough to start nuclear fusion in their cores, which is the process by which our own Sun reaches such tremendous temperatures. Without a large source of heat in their cores, brown dwarfs can’t do anything to maintain a stable temperature, and cool over time as they radiate their heat away into the void.
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WTF? There is a Jet Stream in Earth’s Molten Core.
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Published on 19 Jan 2017
The ESA SWARM satellites have detected a jet stream in Earth’s magnetic core, along with other strange mysteries and anomalies.
Strange days, indeed.
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