RICHARD X : I SAID GET OUT OF MY WAY – X MARKS THE SPOT

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Why does the Total Solar Eclipse Arrise from the West? 33° Synch

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Paul Sutter is an astrophysicist at The Ohio State University and the chief scientist at COSI Science Center. Sutter leads science-themed tours around the world at AstroTouring.com.

Every day, the same routine. The sun rises in the east. Breakfast. Off to work. Work. Home from work. Dinner. The sun sets in the west. Repeat. It’s a pattern familiar to everyone on Earth. For countless generations, we’ve relied on the regular cycles of the heavens to help demarcate our days.

But a total solar eclipse, like the big one coming to the continental United States on Aug. 21, will break the routine. In addition to the moon completely covering the face of the sun — which, let’s admit, is already pretty spectacular — the event will move in an unfamiliar and possibly disquieting direction: from west to east.  [Total Solar Eclipse 2017: When, Where and How to See It (Safely)]

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The normal, daily rising and setting of celestial objects isn’t due to their own movement, but rather the rotation of Earth. As our planet spins on its axis, the heavens appear to rise up from the east, arch their way across the sky, and settle into the west.

It’s hard to blame our ancestors for assuming that Earth — which seemed very large and strong — was incapable of movement, with the ethereal denizens of the heavens gliding along their nested crystal spheres, giving humans our familiar, clockwork celestial movements.

After centuries of serious work, people realized that Earth does indeed spin, and the motion of the sun, moon and stars is only apparent. But when it comes to solar eclipses we’re faced with a new incongruity: why does the path of a solar eclipse start in the west and end in the east?

The answer is simple, but it’s not something we’re accustomed to thinking about: the moon itself orbits Earth from west to east. In other words, if you could rocket up high above the North Pole, the moon would trace out a counterclockwise circle. But Earth rotates about 30 times for a single lunar orbit, so it’s not something we normally notice. During a solar eclipse, the path of the moon’s shadow must follow the motion of the moon itself — to the east.

The solar eclipse is a wonderful opportunity to experience astronomy at its most basic: understanding the intricate dance of heavenly objects.

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X MARKS THE SPOT

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RX UPDATE : 99942 is 33 – X MARKS THE SPOT

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10 spacecraft hit

by massive solar flare

says ESA

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Published time: 16 Aug 2017
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The European Space Agency revealed that 10 satellites and probes were rocked by a massive solar flare as it swept through the solar system.

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The space weather event, known as a coronal mass ejection (CME), was observed by three satellites operating outside the path of the flare, namely ESA’s Proba-2, the ESA-NASA joint project SOHO and NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, in October 2014.

The ESA’s Olivier Witasse had been leading the space agency’s Mars Express, a project examining the effect of the comet Siding Spring on the atmosphere of the Red Planet. During the research, the team detected signs of the CME on Mars and, in the subsequent investigation, accessed data collected by the 10 spacecraft in its path.

“CME speeds with distance from the sun is not well understood, in particular in the outer Solar System,”said Witasse. “Thanks to the precise timings of numerous in situ measurements, we can better understand the process.”
The data gives an indication of the speed, distance and direction of travel of the CME, with the effects of the flare reportedly felt by NASA’s Voyager-2, then at the edge of the solar system approaching Pluto.

After emission, the solar flare travelled at speeds of up to 1,000km per second (6,000 miles per second) before slowing to 500km/sec after reaching the Cassini space probe in November 2014.

Luckily, Earth was not in the CME’s path – a phenomenon that scientists say has potential to be hugely damaging to our way of life.

Experts have warned that a powerful geomagnetic storm would likely knock out power grids, communications and satellite technology, causing trillions of dollars worth of damage to the global economy. They even cite as evidence the 1859 ‘Carrington Event’ in which a solar flare knocked out telegraph systems all over Europe and North America.

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